About The Artist

The process
of creating
a Yardly
Art bowl.


Step 1

The terra cotta clay is wedged, or kneaded to push out air bubbles and completely mix the clay.

Step 2

After thorough wedging the clay is rolled into a slab.

Step 3

The slab is then pushed and formed into a bisqued clay shape that I made.


Step

The kiln has reached temperature & cooled. The new bowl is done!

Sharon Step 4

Once formed to the mold, the extra clay is trimmed away.

Step

The new bowl & others are loaded into the kiln for the glaze firing.

Step

The edges of the new bowl are smoothed with fingers.

Step

Glaze is brushed onto the bowl by hand. This glaze will be turquoise after its next firing.

Since 1980, Sharon Miller-Thompson has designed and created artwork that has been featured in Midwest and East Coast galleries and at the Whitney Museum's Store Next Door in New York City.  Sharon has work in many diferent mediums over the years. While teaching high school Art, she fell in love with clay. Being drawn to the versatility that clay offers: its fluidity and drape; its wood-like stage with capability of being carved; and its everlasting beauty and richness of color when finished, she was hooked.

Metal working and custom ironwork were added to Sharon's art "tool box" in 2000, allowing her to really mix a variety of different art media together in a piece.

A long time avid gardener, she is inspired by the beauty found in nature, many times bringing rocks and leaves into her studio for study and to be interpreted into the design of a new art piece.  " I am most inspired by functional artwork that tells a story through the materials of clay, glass, metals, and often found objects."

In addition to creating her own artwork, Sharon develops permanent installations for residential, commercial, and public settings including large scale ironwork sculptural fences, railings, mixed media hardscapes, and sculptures. Commissions allow Sharon to work with clients to create pieces that are unique and exist in harmony with the natural surroundings of each project.

Sharon received a BA in Fine Art from Macalester College, an MS from Winona State University, and has taken welding classes at St. Paul College.

Both Minnesota natives, Sharon and her husband, Steve, share their century old  home in St. Paul with their 2 dogs, Charlie and Dickens. The house also serves as headquarters for Yardly Art studios, with both dogs overseeing most Yardly Art daily operations.

 

Step 4

A variety of decorations can be impressed into the clay at this point.

Step

The kiln takes 24 hours to complete a firing. When it cools down, bowls can be removed.

Step

The new bowl, still on its form, is set aside to firm up to the leatherhard stage.



Step 1

When completely dry, many bowls are loaded into the kiln for the first or bisque firing.

Step 2

The new bowl is then set back onto the shelves to dry thoroughly.

Step 3

Once leatherhard, the new bowl can be removed from its mold and signed.